MONEAD study seeks local women with epilepsy to learn more about pregnancy-related risks

The Maternal Outcomes and Neurodevelopmental Effects of Anti-Epileptic Drugs (MONEAD) Study is a multi-center observational study designed to look at the effects of anti-epileptic drugs in both mothers and children. Henry Ford Hospital is a study site.

The overall goal of this study is to determine risks that are increased in women with epilepsy during pregnancy and in their children, and to examine the key contributing factors. Adult women with epilepsy will be monitored during pregnancy and postpartum to measure maternal outcomes, and their children will be monitored from birth through age 6 years to measure their health and developmental outcomes. Two control groups will be enrolled for comparison, which include 1) healthy pregnant women without epilepsy and 2) non-pregnant women with epilepsy.

For the women with epilepsy, the following primary outcomes will be measured:

  1. Determine if women with epilepsy have increased seizures during pregnancy and delineate the contributing factors
  2. Determine if C-section rate is increased in women with epilepsy and delineate contributing factors
  3. Determine if women with epilepsy have an increased risk for depression during pregnancy and post-partum period and characterize risks factors

For the children born to women with epilepsy, the following primary outcomes will be measured:
  1. Determine the long-term effects of in utero antiepileptic drug exposure on verbal intellectual abilities and other neurobehavioral outcomes
  2. Determine if small for gestational age and other adverse neonatal outcomes are increased
  3. Determine if breastfeeding when taking AEDs impairs the child’s ultimate verbal and other cognitive outcomes.
An overall goal of this study is to establish the relationship between antiepileptic drug exposure and outcomes in the mother and child as well as describe and explain the variability in antiepileptic drug exposure and response. The results will enable clinicians to better manage women with epilepsy during pregnancy.

For more information, contact Carla M. Sandles (313-916-3923).